Creating a positive working relationship with your pod/scrum team is essential for delivering great products. All teams I work with have amazing chemistry. Sometimes I think I just got lucky with great people but after the 4th team I realized that there’s something in my work approach that helps.

My Product Management Philosophy

  • The opportunity to learn is held above perfection of a feature.
  • Product feedback is a gold mine for feature improvements and new opportunities.
  • Engineering and Product is a partnership, one cannot succeed without the other.
  • Be an expert using your data analytics tool. …

It is so easy to get caught up in the day-to-day of owning a Product but to stay sharp on the latest trends you need to regularly read, browse and listen to outside sources. Here is my go-to list that I refer to 2–3 times a month for feature inspiration.

Image for post

Resources for UX

My team launches at least 1–2 consumer facing A/B tests a month. By proactively reading up on the latest UX designs planning for subsequent iterations becomes much faster. …


When the New York Times podcast, The Daily, came out with their episode titled, The Coronavirus Goes Global, I started paying attention to the impending pandemic. I made my boomer parents listen to the episode, put in an order for N95 masks, and started tracking the virus intimately. It helped that I had co-workers who were equally caught up with the pandemonium as I was; our slack channel is filled with the latest news/rumors/preparation guides on The Virus. We are the most coronavirus obsessed squad at my company.

While the world was beginning to wake up to The Virus I was getting ready for a business trip to NYC. Only a handful of cases had been reported, no lockdowns had been issued and I was not too concerned for my safety. After all, I researched all the basics: no face touching, wipe down all surfaces, and use sanitizer. Also, I’m young and supposedly low-risk. …


Mine was pretty grand when I look back at it. 10 years ago I had graduated high school and at the time I thought I wanted to maybe a lawyer, a diplomat, an entrepreneur or a beach bum. A lot of unknowns and uncertainty but what has transpired is nothing what I had envisioned and it has been quite an adventure. Here are my favorite discoveries from the past 10 years.

Major learnings of the decade:

  1. Money cannot buy you good health.
  2. I have a passion for storytelling, building experiences from scratch using technology, and problem solving.
  3. The better question to ask is not “What do you want to do when you grow up?” but rather “What kind of person do you want to be when you grow up?”. …

Are we where we expected to be? Perhaps we are where we are meant to be?

The value add of an MBA is declining but there are lots of people who still set out to get one for either a salary increase, a career pivot, a growth in network, learn business fundamentals or even just explore new possibilities. I am one of those people and I can say it has been one of the best decisions I have ever made. But do my peers feel the same way? Here are the results of an informal survey taken by my classmates after a year since graduation:

Image for post

The MBA sets students' expectations high that it helps pivot one’s career in a different direction but many respondents noted that changing careers does not happen quickly, it can take years. The MBA does a great job in showing us all the possibilities that we never knew were out there but it’s also an expensive program. 11% of individuals forewent their ideal job just for a paycheck. It’s one of the great dilemmas post-graduation, is a bird in the hand worth two in the bush? …


“What am I doing with my life?” someone moaned to me this week. I’m hearing this phrase a lot lately, probably because I’m in my 20s and these are the sorts of things our generation is fixated about. I hear it from an entrepreneur who failed at a startup, a college student, an MBA grad, a person with a stable job in a toxic environment and I could go on…

We feel as though we carry the weight of the world on our shoulders with every decision we make, that our jobs define who we are, and have an expectation that life should progress linearly. …


An update from a previous post, “Startup Stuck”. A post mortem of sorts.

I pulled the plug on our venture, we unstuck ourselves by moving on. Writing a farewell letter was a mixed bag of emotions, on one hand I felt I had let down our small group of fans and on the other there was a sense of relief, all the challenges disappeared the moment I hit “Send”.

Failure sucks but I now see why many call it a “good” thing:

  • Failure makes you re-think your characteristics and motivations. I always considered myself to be resourceful, determined, and a problem solver, yet this decision goes against those qualities.
  • Failure humbles you. I have an MBA and yet could not put together a successful business. …


Every time I read an article on Tech Crunch or listen to an episode of How I Built This my mind races with all the ideas I have to make an impact on the world. Most of my ideas die in the shower and then I went to business school in Europe, sat in an Entrepreneurship class, and stumbled across a problem to solve: Why did it take 2 years for me to find the right treatment and health practitioner to help me manage my own health condition?

“2 years is too damn long”, I thought to myself. I built a team of passionate individuals and we were accepted into the school’s accelerator. We went deep into understanding the US healthcare industry and realized there were a TON of problems to solve. We cold called, emailed, surveyed and talked to hundreds of individuals. We pivoted ourselves to death. We still did not know how to make money but we pitched an emotional and personal story. We ended the program a top 10 finalist and nominated for “Best Entrepreneurial Project”. …


I Read It So You Don’t Have To: The fourth of a series where I share my notes from readings in business, leadership, careers and self-help.

Building a business that people love and being happy doing it is a challenge and Brian De Haaff, Co-founder and CEO of Aha!, wants to bring us back to the way our grandparents operated businesses: building relationships, quality and value creation. Fundamentals are back in fashion again: people, service, relationships, transparency, trust. They produce results. Brian calls it Lovability and his company is proof that it works.

Our Current Reality

Dreams of personal wealth have given way to the reality that businesses built on hype rarely yield returns.

By focusing on manipulating perceptions instead of achieving meaningful goals, many entrepreneurs are crushing their companies and wasting potential. …


I Read It So You Don’t Have To: The third of a series where I share my notes from readings in business, leadership, careers and self-help.

“As companies combine their increased connectivity to consumers, with the ability to collect, mine, and process consumer data at faster speeds, we are faced with a future where everything becomes potentially more habit forming”. — Nir Eyal

There are 3 criteria for a Hook Cycle:

  1. The product reaches their ultimate goal of unprompted user engagement.
  2. The product brings back users repeatedly.
  3. The product does not depend on costly advertising or aggressive messaging.

Users who continuously find value in a product are more likely to tell their friends about it. Hooked users are brand evangelists.

Why Habits Are Important:

“A habit is when not doing an action causes a bit of pain”.- Nir…

About

Trishna Patel

Consumer Product Manager at HomeAdvisor. Former startup founder, management consultant, and int’l development fellow. Lived, worked and studied on 4 continents.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store